UT Arlington Announces Four Researchers As National Academy of Inventors Fellows

National Academy of InventorsLast week, the University of Houston announced that four of its researchers had been named as fellows to the National Academy of Inventors. Now, UT Arlington has issued a press release highlighting four researchers of its own who were named as NAI fellows.

This year’s UT Arlington’s researchers named as fellows include Dr. Frank Lewis, an electrical engineering professor and a University Distinguished Scholar Professor; Dr. Carolyn Cason, a nursing professor and vice president for research; Dr. Ron Elsenbaumer, professor of chemistry and biochemistry and provost and vice president for academic affairs; and UT Arlington President Vistasp M. Karbhari, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of civil and environmental engineering.

All four members bring a great deal of research prowess and experience to their recent awards. Dr. Lewis currently holds the position as the Moncrief-O’Donnell Endowed Chair Professor at the UT Arlington Research Institute, and is a proven authority in feedback control systems, intelligent control, cooperative multi-agent systems, neural networks for control, discrete event systems, wireless sensor networks, robotics, nonlinear process control, optimal and robust control and adaptive systems. He also holds six related U.S. patents as a result of his research and development.

Dr. Cason’s research and development in the field of nursing has led to a measurable increase in innovation and diversity in the healthcare workforce — a focal point of her work. She is co-founder of UT Arlington’s physical/virtual “Smart Hospital” hybrid, which is equipped with cutting-edge patient simulators that offers nursing and medical students an unprecedented ability to get hands-on experience at the academic level. She also founded the Genomics Translational Research Laboratory, a part of the College of Nursing, in collaboration with colleagues in the College of Engineering. For all of her teaching and research prowess, Dr. Cason also holds a U.S. patent for a cardiopulmonary resuscitation sensor, which has since been commercialized.

Dr. Elsenbaumer is regarded as a pioneer in the field of electronically conducting polymers, having not only developed the technology — along with 25 patents in the area of conductive polymers and their applications — but also established an international group working towards practical applications of the technology.

Finally, Dr. Karbhari is an expert in the field of infrastructure renewal, as well as multi-threat mitigation of infrastructure, durability, mechanics and processing of composites. In addition to holding a U.S. patent for composite components, Dr. Karbhari’s works utilized in several fields including infrastructure rehabilitation, crash-energy management, and biomedical materials.

For as diverse and accredited as this year’s NAI fellows from UT Arlington are, the institution consistently contributes impressive rosters of new fellows. In 2013, NAI inducted UT Arlington College of Engineering faculty members Khosrow Behbehani, Nai Yuen Chen, George Kondraske and Robert Magnusson among its charter fellows. In order to be elected to NAI Fellow status, researchers must demonstrate “a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society, according to the organization,” according to a recent press release.

Dr. Karbhari commended both UT Arlington and his colleagues in receiving the award: ”The University of Texas at Arlington has a tremendous set of accomplished faculty who are internationally recognized in their fields of research,” Karbhari said. “My colleagues are distinguished not only by their patents and discoveries, but by their dedication to sharing innovation with the global community and enabling the translation of fundamental research into practical applications for the benefit of humankind.”

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