TAMHSC Professor Creates Research Summer Program for Students

Dr. Robin Fuchs-YoungThe long ordeal of relocating in order to pursue one’s career and professional education has been inevitable for most medical students. TAMHSC professor Dr. Robin Fuchs-Young experienced this great move and adjustment to a new city when she finished her doctoral degree in Pathology in Nashville, Tennessee and had to move to Bryan, Texas for her research on breast cancer.

According to Dr. Fuchs-Young, although the experience can be a lot of work, she considers it necessary for people to explore the world, gain new experiences and take in the differences between institutions and their scientists: “It’s important for people to go out into the world and have new experiences and learn how different institutions and scientists handle what they do,” Fuchs-Young said, according to a recent article by Kendall Cherry at Texas A&M’s Vital Record news website. She said the exposure to this diversity in different locations gives students varied perspectives on how to understand and solve problems. It also hones their critical thinking to help them better identify problems.

Fuchs-Young, while pursuing her doctorate in pathology, was able to take her classes with medical students, and she claims this made all the difference in her future studies on breast cancer. She said being exposed to how medical students thought and approached the disease helped her gain a new perspective in her research.

She decided to join TAMHSC because of the institution’s focus on research and outreach programs that are specific to underrepresented minorities in scientific and healthcare research. Fuchs-Young believes so much in emphasizing diversity in healthcare research that she came up with a 10-week summer research program for medical students and undergraduates that allows them a sizable preview of what a career in research would be like. From this program, she encountered individuals that discovered their true inclination to the field of research, and others that realized research was not for them.

According to her, even though some of the students conclude the summer program with the realization that research isn’t a field they’d be a good fit for, they get to take home learnings on the experimental design process which will help them in their future endeavors in their profession.

Photo from the Vital Record.

Scroll To Top